Opus

Screenshot of the new Opus website

Opus is an international financial firm with comprehensive offerings and expertise. Unfortunately, their former website wasn’t built to show off the variety of their work and had an out-of-date feel.

The new opus.com (formerly opusglobal.com), designed by the team at UpTrending, is primarily built to give visitors a chance to get to know the myriad areas of expertise and related service offerings. Because these topics are all quite different, it also needed to be flexible to display information about each depending its qualities. Finally, the rich information on the site needed to be fully responsive and engaging.

My role: For many Wordpress builds at UpTrending, one developer will handle essentially all site building and theming. As the lead developer on the Opus site this was my responsibility, supported by other devs when resourcing necessitated it.

One key feature of opus.com is the vast array of “solution” offerings and regulations that they help address. On the Regulations landing page, for example, expanding sections within the page reveal regulations within topic areas. Each parent topic and revealed sub-regulation is an individual page. It was originally suggested to build the listings on landing pages like “Regulations” with the Advanced Custom Fields Pro plugin (ACF) and have the client manually enter each topic area and sub-topic. Understanding the upkeep burden this would put on the client, I suggested then implemented a custom solution using the page hierarchy system. Unless a field was activated to show no children, child pages of the main topic areas would automatically be added within, reducing duplicative work and potential mistakes.

Again looking to make the end user’s life easier, I took a page from my Drupal history and created several custom post types for events, careers, press releases, press coverage, and staff. While similar effects of listing pages and custom fields (using ACF) could have been reached, for example, by creating categories of blog posts for events and the press types, I knew that organizing that content as an editor could quickly get confusing. A simple custom plugin for post types paired with the great ACF Pro plugin created a stronger platform.

On the front end of things, I enjoyed working up some nice interactive components based on our designer’s great work. The expanding and filtering career listing is a good example of this, using some well thought-out Sass variables and the great Isotope Javascript filtering library.

Check out the new Opus website.